Map for “Treasure of Lima, a burried exhibition” by Constant Dullaart, 2014

Map-for-Treasure-of-Lima-a-burried-exhibition-by-Constant-Dullaart-2014

Map for “Treasure of Lima, a burried exhibition”
by Constant Dullaart, 2014

A “stainless steel 3d printed cylinder with encrypted location” made by Constant Dullaart for “Treasure of Lima: A Buried Exhibition.”

Review: Highlights of NYFF Projections 2014

Lorem Ipsum 1 (2013) by Victoria Fu

Lorem Ipsum 1 (2013) by Victoria Fu

Last month, the 2014 New York Film Festival unveiled the debut of the “Projections” program, a section of the NYFF that presents “an international selection of artists’ film and video work that expands upon our notions of what the moving image can do and be.” Previously known as “Views From The Avant Garde,” which was programmed by Mark McElhatten and Gavin Smith, this subterranean section of the NYFF has been a premiere destination for avant-garde and experimental cinema. With the Projections program, curators Gavin Smith, Aily Nash, and Dennis Lim moved the program in a noticeably new direction, a direction that is more open to exhibiting video work and the work of emerging artists.

We had the pleasure of viewing the many of the short works that exhibited at the 2014 NYFF’s Projections program and this article highlights some of our favorites.

 

Tomonari Nishikawa

Sound of a Million Insects, Light of a Thousand Stars
Tomonari Nishikawa, Japan, 2014, 2 min, 35mm, color, sound

Sound of a Million Insects, Light of a Thousand Stars is a conceptual celluloid film wherein artist Tomonari Nishikawa buries 100 feet of 35mm film negative underground near a Japanese countryside road that is 15 miles away from the infamous Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Nishikawa states that, “The area was once an evacuation zone, but now people live there after the removal of the contaminated soil. This film was exposed to the possible remaining radioactive materials.” The results are abstract and beautiful, producing blots and streaks in colors of marine, fluorescent green and cyan, and observing these colored marks jitter across the screen evokes contemplation over strange and powerful forces, e.g., nuclear energy and its latent ability to either help or harm humanity.

 

Night-Noon-Shambhavi-Kaul

Night Noon
Shambhavi Kaul, Mexico/USA, 2014, 12 min, video, color, sound

In the opening of Shambhavi Kaul’s Night Noon, howling winds dust up sand and travel across the barren desert lands of Death Valley, poetically observing the interactions between the natural forces and Mother Earth and its inhabitants. Trekking across the land in a graceful and hushed manner, the film patiently captures the beautiful surroundings as it moves ahead to find large glistering bodies of water, strange rock formations, and living creatures like colorful parrots and wild dogs. Immaculately framed, and subtly stylized with moving compositions that sometimes verge on the surreal, Night Noon is an absorbing moving image portrait of the natural environments that exist far away from human life.   Read more